An analysis of the symptoms and cause of atherosclerosis

Many forces can cause this damage, including high blood pressure, cigarette smoke, diabetes, high cholesterol, conditions that cause blood to clot more easily, drugs such as cocaine and androgens, and possibly infections of the inner linings of the arteries.

Atherosclerosis can occur in any artery in the body, from those nourishing the heart coronary arteries to those supplying the brain, intestines, kidneys, and legs. Physical exam The doctor will listen to the arteries using a stethoscope to see if there is an unusual "whooshing" sound as a result of uneven blood flow.

Print Overview Arteriosclerosis occurs when the blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients from your heart to the rest of your body arteries become thick and stiff — sometimes restricting blood flow to your organs and tissues. They can stay in the artery wall.

Such blood clots are the cause of heart attacks and strokes. That causes your white blood cells to stream in to digest the LDL. If the blood supply becomes limited, there is a serious risk of developing chronic kidney disease. In some cases, treatment may include medication or surgery. Sometimes a blood clot completely blocks blood flow, or even breaks apart and can trigger a heart attack or stroke.

Air quality is also a factor that can potentially cause this condition. Additional surgeries may be necessary to treat various complications associated with aortic atherosclerosis including coronary bypass surgery, abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, peripheral artery surgery or other heart surgeries.

Atherosclerosis is the buildup of cholesterol-filled deposits called plaque on the inner walls of arteries. The National Center for Biotechnology noted stable angina as a common symptom due to the fact that the plaque accumulation associated with atherosclerosis can cause arteries to narrow, which restricts the flow of blood.

Treatment options include lifestyle changes, various medications, and surgical interventions. This is a heart attack. It has a smooth lining and is free of blockages that interfere with blood flow. If the fibrous cap ruptures, a blood clot can form. The doctor then inserts an additional catheter with a balloon on the end of the wire.

During this treatment a doctor makes a small incision in the groin area and inserts a catheter into the incision. A healthy artery is like a clean pipe: Narrowing in the arteries of the legs from plaque causes poor circulation. Symptoms Atherosclerosis develops gradually.

If there are high levels of fat and sugar, it could indicate an increased risk of atherosclerosis. By making blood less likely to clot, aspirin reduces the chances of having a heart attack among men and women with coronary artery disease or those with significant risk factors for it.

Diets that are high in unhealthy fats, cholesterol and other unhealthy foods are directly linked to aortic atherosclerosis. If you have atherosclerosis in the arteries leading to your kidneys, you develop high blood pressure or kidney failure.

However, it is important that a doctor correctly diagnoses atherosclerosis to make sure that the arteries are returned to full capability.

What Is Atherosclerosis?

Those who are at risk of developing atherosclerosis will likely be told by their doctor to change their lifestyle and maintain a healthy weight. Each patient received transesophageal echocardiography in order to determine if aortic atherosclerotic plaques were present.

Cells from the wall of the artery gradually surround the mixture. An ultrasound scanner can check blood pressure at distinct parts of the body. Whatever causes the initial damage, the result is that platelets from the bloodstream gather at the site, soon to be joined by a gruel-like mixture of cholesterol and other fats, calcium deposits, and cell debris.

This makes it painful for you to walk.

What to know about atherosclerosis

Even under the cap, the deposit can grow, progressively blocking blood flow and ultimately causing chest pain angina.Learn about atherosclerosis and how to treat and prevent it.

Atherosclerosis is a narrowing of the arteries caused by a buildup of plaque. It’s also called arteriosclerosis or hardening of the arteries, and it can lead to heart attack, stroke, or heart failure if left untreated. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of cholesterol-filled deposits called plaque on the inner walls of arteries.

Plaque narrows the vessels and slows down blood flow. Atherosclerosis can occur in any artery in the body, from those nourishing the heart (coronary arteries) to those supplying the.

Atherosclerosis causes, symptoms As mentioned, atherosclerosis is caused by the plaque buildup in the arteries, making them stiff and hard, reducing blood flow to other parts of the body. Atherosclerosis usually doesn’t cause symptoms until middle or older age.

But as the narrowing becomes severe, it can choke off blood flow and cause pain. Blockages can also rupture suddenly. That’ll cause blood to clot inside an artery at the site of the rupture.

Plaque Attacks.

Atherosclerosis: symptoms and treatments

Plaques from atherosclerosis can behave in different ways. Symptoms. The first signs of atherosclerosis can begin to develop during adolescence, with streaks of white blood cells appearing on the artery wall.

Most often, there are no symptoms until a plaque ruptures, or the blood flow is very restricted. This typically takes many years to occur. The symptoms depend on which arteries are affected. If you have atherosclerosis in the arteries in your arms and legs, you may have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, such as leg pain when walking (claudication).

If you have atherosclerosis in the arteries leading to your kidneys, you develop high blood pressure or kidney failure.

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An analysis of the symptoms and cause of atherosclerosis
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